Friday, June 23, 2017

Book Review: Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny

I'd been meaning to read the 1968 Hugo-award-winning novel Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny for several years now. However, since it wasn't available on the Kindle store and I lived abroad, I relied instead on checking bookstores whenever I traveled. Unfortunately, as an old book, it was never to be found. Now that I'm a bit more settled down, I just took the plunge and ordered it online. The blurb alone should be enough to interest avid readers:

Earth is long since dead. On a colony planet, a band of men has gained control of technology, made themselves immortal, and now rule their world as the gods of the Hindu pantheon. Only one dares oppose them: he who was once Siddhartha and is now Mahasamatman. Binder of Demons, Lord of Light.

Keep reading for my full review.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Moving to Baltimore


A few months ago, I wrote about leaving the BDNYC research group and moving out of New York. However, I haven't talked about the other end of the trip: moving into Baltimore and starting my work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). I've now been here since April so it's well past time I write about this, particularly since I feel that I've settled down nicely and have had several opportunities to see what Baltimore is all about.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Book Review: The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi

The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi is his latest space opera in a brand new universe. Scalzi is probably best known for Old Man's War, and the accompanying books. I've read some of his work before and keep coming back whenever I want some light-hearted, funny books in a science fiction setting. I was very excited by the premise of this new book and gave it a shot.

You can find my spoiler-free review after the jump.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Book Review: Iron Council by China Mieville

Iron Council is the third novel set in China Mieville's Bas-Lag universe. It's a curious world with both magic and technology, and lots of odd peoples in it. In the first book, Perdido Street Station, we got to see the city of New Crobuzon as it falls to chaos. In the second book, The Scar, we follow a young woman fleeing New Crobuzon only to end up in the pirate city of Armada. Here, on the third novel, we switch back and forth between New Crobuzon at the edge of civil war and the ever-running train of Iron Council.

Sunday, April 2, 2017

BDNYC and Beyond


For the past year and a half I’ve been working in New York City as part of the Brown Dwarfs in New York City (BDNYC) research group at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). In this blog post I’ll describe my experiences in that time and how I went about getting my new job at Space Telescope.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Book Review: The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin

The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin is the second book in The Broken Earth series. It follows directly after The Fifth Season, which was an incredible book on its own. N.K. Jemisin continues the tradition of excellence with The Obelisk Gate, an exciting story that sheds light on a lot of the mysteries of the various characters and the world itself.

Read on for my full spoiler-free review.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Book Review: Caliban's War by James S. A. Corey

I follow several authors on Twitter and Daniel Abraham, one half of James S. A. Corey, is one of them (the other half being Ty Frank). As such, I've been hearing a lot of news from him (and other sources) about the second season of The Expanse on SyFy. This book series was converted to a television show and has done very well. I saw a few episodes and hope to catch up this year; as such, I decided to continue reading the series to make sure I've read it before watching it. And so, here's my review of Caliban's War, the second book in the series.

Read on for my spoiler-free review.